Rolling

It’s a major moment to roll my print. I have to turn it under itself when I want to have a look. This part is filled with jeopardy as it’s the most likely time it could get damaged. I also do it on my own. It would probably be a lot easier if I had a really huge table and could do it the way they do in the lab. But working as I do this is how I have to do it. So here is the record, getting increasingly difficult.

Rolling

The edge of the container

I have been making a border this week with reference to the 18th century embroidery patterns that inform the other part of the work, not yet revealed. The idea of the border, that runs down the length of the paper, offers the reference to the material. It also brings in ideas of containment and what an ‘edge’ means to a thing, a subject, a space. Our skin is another border and there is a whole language available when I puncture it.

I am very conscious that perforating it is about breaching the border of skin, that there is a vocabulary about intersubjectivity here. The border between bodies is skin. And in that puncture mark, the border between us… is lessened.

The edge of the container

Inch by Inch

It’s slow progress but it is satisfying seeing it grow. I’m documenting the stages so that I have an accurate record, a sort of artist-time-stamp, if you will. These are the leaves I was talking about on my Instagram Stories.

Inch by Inch

Work in progress

I am continuing to figure out all the logistics of how to make substantially larger perforated prints than I have attempted before. I am currently translating elements of embroidery skills and patterns that I have been studying and applying these on photographic paper.

I’m using it in my perforations to look like a ‘Stomacher’ from the 18th Century. I was interested in how the straight line would work across the curve of the body.

These images here are a couple of close-ups of the paper from the front…The print as a whole is 1.2 x 1.4 metres so the size of the body in the image is a fantastic space to work with. I’ve included at the end an image of a piece of my Jacobean Crewel Work – I wanted to show how the stitches from one medium are translated into another. I have been interested in using the specifics of the language of each stitch – in the second image here you can see an interpretation of ‘Trellis stitch lattice’ which is, as it sounds, a bit like a trellis across a large area. In the embroidery at the end it’s in the top left flower. It’s a very useful stitch as it gives you a grid.

Work in progress